Pilot Intoxication

Many have a fear of flying. While today air travel is one of the fastest, most efficient, and safest modes of transportation, many are still aware of the anxiety inducing dangers this form of travel is associated with. Some do not share in this anxiety, and assume that everything will go smoothly in their flight. Regardless, both kinds of [passengers put their trust and their faith in the crew of the plane which holds their lives. The pilot in particular is expected to be fully alert, aware and focused so as to best prevent any accident that could occur. Unfortunately, there are times when a pilot is not at their best when performing this difficult task. Pilot intoxication is one of the most preventable causes of airplane accidents and should not be tolerated.

According to the website of the Jeff Sampson Law Firm, some federal laws that are in place to prevent pilot intoxication include:

  • Pilots may not consume any alcohol within eight hours of their flight
  • No crew member or pilot may be under the influence of any controlled substance
  • Crew members may not have a blood alcohol that exceeds 0.04

These strict laws are in place to provide clear guidelines so that pilots have no excuses to not be fully aware of the risk they are putting their passengers in should they choose to violate any of these rules.

Plane crashes are some of the greatest tragedies a family can suffer. In some cases these catastrophic losses are simply tragic accidents, which could not have been prevented. However, at times these crashes are due to the intoxication of the most trusted member of the crew: the pilot. In these cases, the victim or families of the victims of such an accident may be entitled to certain damages to help ease the financial burden of such a loss.

What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is a unique syndrome in which pain is experienced in a limb. There are two types of this ailment, and it typically results from a traumatic injury, surgery, or heart attack. There are numerable symptoms of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and a person should be treated immediately upon recognition of it.

Traumatic injuries resulting from a crushing accident, car accident, or amputations can onset Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. When detected, characteristics define which of two types the case falls under. Type one is when the injury hasn’t resulted in damage to the nerves. It can be referred to as sympathetic dystrophy syndrome, and is the leading type of those afflicted. Secondly, Type 2 is when nerves have been injured as a result of the accident.

Symptoms include pain, limited movement, weakness, swelling, or sensitivity. These effects can subside without medication, however they can also persist for long amounts of time. If the pain does not go away, seeking medical attention is imperative to prevent further complications. If untreated, the injured can develop atrophy or contracture. Atrophy occurs when the body has weakened to the point where movement is limited, and contracture consists of the muscles tightening so much so to where muscles settle in a fixed, contracted position.

To treat Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, doctors can prescribe medicine or suggest therapies. Possible medicines are pain relievers, anti-depressants, or bone-loss medicines. Furthermore, patients can undergo physical therapy, spinal cord stimulation, or can utilize topical analgesics.

The website of Crowe & Mulvey, LLP, notes the injustice of a preventable injury. If involved in an accident in which another person’s negligence has resulted in your injury, you may be eligible for financial compensation.